THE ROLE OF THE INTERIOR DESIGNER

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THE ROLE OF THE INTERIOR DESIGNER

THE ROLE OF THE INTERIOR DESIGNER 

– The role of the Interior Designer involves spatial planning, and is often confused with that of an Interior Decorator, who deals mainly with surface decoration.

– The decorative aspect of a scheme is often that last part that an Interior Designer puts together for a scheme.

– Following a consultation with the client, a survey and measure up of the area is carried out, followed by research, design and product sourcing services. 

– An Interior Designer’s role is to advise and interpret a client’s ideas and to design an environment that really satisfies their requirements. 

– An Interior Designer will set about creating the right design solutions for a client after assessing their lifestyle, personal habits, tastes, needs and preferences. 

– An Interior Designer can transform an interior with imagination to suit a client’s personality or corporate image. 

– In Interior Designer’s training/expertise includes: 

  • Understanding of the properties and suitability of materials 
  • Knowledge of fire safety 
  • Ability to assess potential hazards 

– The design process takes into account the purpose, safety and practicality of each area. 

– Where period renovation is involved, an Interior Designer will carry out period research and prepare schemes to suit the architectural style of the property. 

– An Interior Designer’s professional advice and guidance can take the hassle out of planning and decision-making, save valuable time, and prevent costly mistakes.

An interior designer must spend a great deal of their time on administration and liaison.  Tasks include processing orders, dealing with suppliers, manufacturers and retailers, and of course clients. A large part of their work involves measurements and quantities, and visiting sites, checking the work of trades people, managing budgets and progress reporting. All of this requires a clean driver’s licence and a reliable vehicle, as well as insurances, a range of samples, design books and publications. It is also in their best interests to be a member of a professional body and to undertake continued professional development to keep abreast of industry developments.

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